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My cookbook: "Tehran to New York"

On the Norouz day of 2020 spring, I finally published my book. The manuscript is titled: "Tehran to New York: A culinary bridge between Persian and Western cultures" and aims at presenting a unique blend of classic and contemporary Persian recipes, as well as samples of Western-style cuisine, offered in a Persian context. It is important to build bridges between cultures, and not walls. This book aims at constructing a bridge between the Persian and Western cultures. The book may be ordered here:
https://www.amazon.com/Tehran-New-York-culinary-cultures-ebook/dp/B0861H47GS/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=tehran+to+new+york&qid=1584810930&sr=8-1

Scallion crepe Manicotti with meat stuffing


Fresh herbs play a major role in Persian cuisine. An innumerable number of Persian dishes may call for a very particular herb or an assortment of other herbs. Many of such herbs are exclusively indigenous of Iran; the Caspian region, in particular, features many unique herbs. The Persian cuisine is generally far less spicy, compared to those of our neighboring countries. The major reason behind such characteristics is the liberal use of herbs and fruits, in lieu of the common Middle Eastern and South Asian spices. As a result of such hereditary love of herbs, I have adjusted the status of these green crepes to the "default crepe." The presented meat stuffed Manicotti is an absolute favorite brunch.   

Ingredients:*
Scallion crepe (recipe follows)
1 recipe meat ragu
3.52 Oz (~100 gr) sharp cheddar
Scallion crepe:
3 sprigs of scallion, green parts only
1.24 Oz (~35 gr) parsley leaves (no stems)
2 large eggs
2 cups 2% milk
3 TBSP butter, melted
1 cup all-purpose flour
½ TSP salt
* Depending on the size of your pan and the thickness of your crepes, this recipe should yield 15~20 crepes. In case of running out of the stuffing, you may fridge the batter and use later.

Make the batter by mixing all the ingredients listed under "Scallion crepe." Let rest in the fridge for at least 15 minutes, while making the stuffing. Unlike pancake batter, crepe batter appreciates some rest in the fridge.
Make the stuffing following the instructions, provided on the original link.
The best practice in crepe preparation is using oil spray. The non-stick pan should have the absolute minimal amount of oil. You may also dip a piece of paper towel in oil and rub it over the pan to provide the required oil film.
Make the crepes, stuff them with meat, and tightly arrange them in a baking dish. Sprinkle with cheese. Melt the cheese in a 375 F (~ 190 C) oven for 5~10 minutes.
This might actually be better than the original Manicotti, as the result of crepe's herbaceous notes and astonishing visual contrast.

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